International Student

CLASSES AND COURSEWORK RESOURCES


For questions not addressed in the FAQs, these resources contain a wealth of information on the subject(s):


FINANCIAL AND ACADEMIC POLICY CONTACTS AND RESOURCES


For questions not addressed in the FAQs, these resources contain a wealth of information on the subject(s):


HOUSING CONTACTS AND RESOURCES


For questions not addressed in the FAQs, these resources contain a wealth of information on the subject(s):


What is the difference between the recommended third dose and the booster shot?

Updated Nov. 11, 2021

In August, the CDC recommended a third dose of the two-dose vaccine series (i.e. Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna Covid-19 vaccines) for individuals with moderately to severely compromised immune systems. Individuals who are immunocompromised often do not develop a protective level of immunity from just two doses, so a third dose is necessary to achieve protection.

In October, the CDC recommended Covid-19 vaccine boosters for a broader group of people based upon age, underlying medical conditions, and occupation. A booster dose of vaccine is for individuals with a normal immune system who developed protective levels of immunity from the first two doses of vaccine, but whose protection has waned with time. The recommendation of a booster dose now applies to all three vaccines approved or authorized for use in the U.S.


 

Why would I need a booster shot?

Updated Nov. 11, 2021

There is growing evidence that protection against severe illness, hospitalization, and death from Covid-19 wanes with time in those who have received the primary series of the Pfizer, Moderna, or Johnson & Johnson vaccine. This reduction in protection occurs particularly in older individuals. A booster dose of vaccine stimulates the immune system to reestablish protective levels of immunity.


 

What does it mean to be fully vaccinated?

Updated Sept. 29, 2021

At this time, the definition of "fully vaccinated" has not changed. Individuals who are two weeks past receiving both doses of a two-dose vaccine series, or two weeks past receiving the first dose of a one-dose vaccine series, are considered fully vaccinated.


 

How should students who are ill, have tested positive, or need to quarantine be accommodated?

Updated Sept. 15, 2021

Instructors should accommodate students who need to isolate or quarantine due to Covid-19 — or students who test negative for Covid-19 but have symptoms similar to it, or who have any other illness and choose to stay home in the interest of protecting others — as they normally would have accommodated ill students before the pandemic. Students should not be instructed that they have to have a doctor’s note to be excused from class. This practice unnecessarily utilizes limited patient appointment slots and can prevent those with serious illness from being able to schedule care.

Students who are experiencing longer-term symptoms or illness due to an active Covid-19 infection should be referred to the Office of Disability Services to determine if temporary academic accommodations may be warranted.


 

 

 

Will faculty accommodate students who must be out because of Covid-19?

Yes. Instructors should accommodate students who need to quarantine due to Covid-19 as they normally would have accommodated ill students before the pandemic. Faculty are not required to record lectures or class meetings, but may choose to do so. The method or approach to providing content and makeup work for the students is at the instructor's discretion. As needed, they are encouraged to work with their school chairs to determine the most appropriate path.

Will faculty accommodate students who must be out because of Covid-19?

Yes. Instructors should accommodate students who need to quarantine due to Covid-19 as they normally would have accommodated ill students before the pandemic. Faculty are not required to record lectures or class meetings, but may choose to do so. The method or approach to providing content and makeup work for the students is at the instructor's discretion. As needed, they are encouraged to work with their school chairs to determine the most appropriate path.


 

Will the current vaccines protect us from new strains of Covid-19?

Updated Aug. 16, 2021

Multiple variants of the Covid-19 virus that seem to spread more easily and quickly have been identified in the United Kingdom, South Africa, and Brazil. The UK variant was reported in the U.S. at the end of December 2020, and the South Africa and Brazil variants at the end of January 2021.

Currently, the most prevalent variant in the U.S. is the delta variant, which was first detected in the U.S. in March 2021. The CDC classifies the delta variant as a variant of concern due to its increased transmissibility and severity of disease.

Recent studies show that current vaccines remain highly effective at preventing serious illness and death, even when infected with the delta variant. The current vaccines also significantly reduce the risk of getting infected with the delta variant. However, when someone who is fully vaccinated does get infected with the delta variant, they can spread the virus to others. In this way, infection with the delta variant is different from previous variants.

The CDC is working to monitor the spread of identified variants, characterize emerging viral variants, and expand its ability to find new SARS-CoV-2 variants.


 

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